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Getting There (and Out)

June 1, 2006 10:24 PM

A major advantage of the Rapid Park site is the easy access to existing infrastructure.

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Getting to this park will be easier than just about every other MLB park in the country. (On paper at least)

Posted on July 9, 2006 at 10:02 PM by tito Highlight this comment 1

Thanky Thanky for all this good ifonmrtaion!

Posted on August 18, 2011 at 5:08 PM by Ivalene Highlight this comment 2


By Rail

One of the most exciting aspects of the site is its proximity to two different forms of rail transportation.

From the north (from as far away as Big Lake), you'll arrive via the Northstar Commuter Rail. This project, slated to open in 2009, has the potential to do for the north what the Hiawatha Light Rail has done for the south. Fares are expected to be from $4 to $6 dollars each direction (with station parking free). Best of all, the Minneapolis terminal will be located either within or directly adjacent to the ballpark.

This has been a rather controversial project, and funding is not 100% secure -- something I cannot understand. I've ridden similar lines in Boston, Chicago, and San Diego. This is an amazing way to travel. Those who oppose it will probably one day feel somewhat sheepish.

From the south, you'll arrive by the Hiawatha Light Rail after parking for free at one of the Park-n-Ride lots along its route. As of this writing, the line ends at First Avenue North, about two blocks from the ballpark site. It is expected that a short extension will be completed in time for the park opening.

From the east, you may be able to arrive by the St. Paul extension to the light rail line (known as the Central Corridor). This is slated to run down University Avenue to the capitol building. No schedule has yet been established, but the success of the Hiawatha line bodes well for this extension. Of course, there is short-sighted opposition to this project as well.


By Car

If you are coming from the west, you'll arrive via I-394 and probably park in one of the three municipal parking ramps designed for use by commuters and carpoolers.

If you are coming from the north via I-94, you'll exit at 4th Street. This ramp, in addition to affording a beautiful view of the park and skyline as you approach (it's kind of like flying into the city), will dump you directly into the warehouse district at 2nd Avenue North. From there, you may try the 4th Street parking ramp.

If you are coming from the north via I-35W, you'll no longer enjoy the easy access you do now to the Metrodome. You'll probably still exit at Washington Avenue, turn right, but then follow it a couple of miles to the warehouse district. The more industrious will exit farther north, perhaps at East Hennepin Avenue or University Avenue/4th Street SE, and then find their way by city street (ultimately crossing the river on the Third Avenue or Hennepin Avenue bridge).

If you are coming from the south, you'll have two choices:

You may want to follow the I-35W spur into downtown and make your way on city streets the last mile and a half to the site. There are lots of places to park along the way, though this may be a rather pokey trip.

You may prefer to exit from I-35W to I-94 west, go through the tunnel, then exit to Olson Memorial Highway, turn right and follow either Sixth Street (which will merge into 5th Street) or 7th Street. No doubt parking opportunities will spring up on this side of the park, though there isn't much there now.

If you are coming from the east, you'll probably follow I-94 through the tunnel and exit at Olson Memorial Highway as indicated above. If you are more adventurous, you may prefer to exit earlier and come through the University of Minnesota campus (past the new Gopher football stadium) on University/4th Street, or maybe via Washington Avenue to Third Street South. You'll probably want to avoid exiting to downtown Minneapolis on 5th Street (as you would to the Dome) since it is permanently closed at the government center and the path gets very circuitous at that point.


By Bus

Many routes terminate near the site at a transit hub which is built into the 5th Street ramp.


By Foot

True fans may want to check out the many new housing opportunities within walking distance of the park. There are many warehouses being converted into condos nearby, some distinctinve (and expensive) new construction to the north, and the distinct possibility that a whole row of highrise dwellings will replace the surface parking lots and beach volleyball courts which now are directly adjacent.


This page was last modified on January 21, 2010.



"You talk about the magic, the aura, but what really makes a stadium is the fans. Concrete doesn't talk back to you. Chairs don't talk back to you. It's the people who are there, day in, day out, that makes the place magic."

– Bernie Williams

Explore the Site

Here are 50 images chosen randomly from the 3045 found on this site. Click the image to be taken to the original post. A new list is created every 10 minutes.


Go get 'em, boys!



The first completed mural












Looking back toward the park from just beyond the north end of the Northstar platform.



Field access on the visitor's side



The entrance from the service level corridor. (You have to pass the Twins clubhouse door to get there.)









These stairs will meet the skyway.









This looks like a Twins Pub, but is actually the scoreboard operations.






A southpaw?






View Level



New Concept Drawing - No Roof



The main ticketing area beneath the restaurant.



Clyde Doepner's Met Stadium Memorabilia (Source: LP)



This is the trapezoid (for lack of a better name) in right center. Be sure to notice section of seats just below the pavilion and above the fence (which I hadn't noticed before). For those who are interested, what looks like an old-style scoreboard is in fact a high-def video board which will look, at times, like an old-fashioned scoreboard.






Rally Hanky (2002 ALCS)



A cold afternoon in 323, but we had our trusty Twins blanket -- made by my mom when Noah was born.









Roped off for the LRT crowd



This looks south and shows how the Northstar tracks are sheltered by the promenade above. This is the side which faces the HERC plant.



A whole bunch of guys working on something.



The former Ford manufacturing plant (now Ford Centre).



Flagpole historian Ben McEvers at far right (click for the full photo set, graciously loaned to this site by Pat Backen)



Looking northeast from the ballpark site (Source: LP)



From the roof of the Minnekahda building (courtesy Bruce Lambrecht).






Detail of Entry Plaza #4 (north entry from Fifth Street)



First, an overview. The base of the plaza here will meet the base of Sixth Street at Second Avenue.



July 7, 1966 (Click to see the entire scorecard with ads)



This opportunity is half a block up Third Avenue and thousands of people walk right by before and after games.



Before the team came out to warm up, Kirby Puckett, Jr. was playing Frisbee out in center.



Gate 34 Puckett









Impractical, expensive, undeniably cool (Angel Stadium, source LP)



Ye Olde Tyme Vegetable Cart (and its modern cousin)



Solution for a hot night, just inside Gate 34 (that's a cool mist, by the way, not hot steam, which would be kind of cruel)



Some baseball legends (and Ron Coomer)






Panels arriving on flatbed trailers in front of the Twins' dugout.



Ballpark elevation diagram, viewed from Fifth Street. (Click to enlarge.)


Glossary

BPM - Ballpark Magic

BRT - Bus Rapid Transit

DSP - Dave St. Peter

FSE - Full Season Equivalent

FYS - Fake Yankee Stadium (see also: NYS)

HERC - Hennepin Energy Resource Company (aka the Garbage Burner)

HPB - Home Plate Box

HRP - Home Run Porch

LC - Legends Club

LRT - Light Rail Transit

MBA - Minnesota Ballpark Authority (will own Target Field)

MOA - Mall of America

MSFC - Minnesota Sports Facilities Commission (owns the Metrodome)

NYS - New Yankee Stadium

SRO - Standing Room Only

STH - Season Ticket Holder

TCFBS - TCF Bank Stadium

TF - Target Field

Selected Bibliography - Analysis
 


(1993)
 


First Edition (1992)
 


Second Edition (2006)
 


(2008)
 

Selected Bibliography - Surveys
 


(1975)
 


Second Edition (1987)
 


Not a "Third Edition" exactly,
but it replaced the above title
(2000)
 


(2000, large coffee table)
 


Original edition (2000, round)
 


Revised edition (2006, round)
 


(2001, medium coffee table)
 


(2002, small coffee table)
 


(2003, medium coffee table)
 


(2004, very large coffee table)
 


(2006, very large coffee table)
 


Combines the previous two titles
(2007, medium coffee table)
 

Selected Bibliography - Nostalgia
 


(1992)
 


Book and six ballpark miniatures
(2004)
 

Complete Bibliography

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