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Washington Malaise

March 14, 2007 1:07 AM

I had a quick chance to take a look at the renderings and photographs of the new Washington ballpark over at JDLand. I'd seen some of these renderings before, but it's nice to get a little bit of context.

It's also very cool to see what it looks like when a ballpark starts to emerge from barren land (check out the construction photos). If they ever start building our park, you'll see that type of documentation here.

Nationals Ballpark Site (Twins Site Overlay)

Site plan for the new Nationals ballpark, with the size of the Rapid Park site overlaid

But I have to agree to a certain extent with John's comment below about the looks of this ballpark. I wouldn't exactly call it "ugly", but it will probably never be taken for "soaring architecture" either. In fact, I'm struck by it's blandness and utter lack of personality. It's a good thing that they're planning to install cherry trees, because without them, this building could only inspire yawns.

It has a very massive feel, and part of that is because it's being built on a site over twice as large (20 1/5 acres) as the Rapid Park site the Twins hope to use (see image)! That means there's lots of room to stretch out and build gigantic staircases, observation towers (which will presumably offer observation of only the passing traffic outside the park), and even a full office complex. This is one very large site on which will be built one very large ballpark.

In terms of design, it appears to have almost no facade -- at least no unifying theme around the outside (or the inside for that matter). The elevation diagrams show a building which reveals its skeleton (not necessarily a bad thing), and doesn't really strive to look like anything.

I know that architectural significance was discussed and eventually required when the financing for the park was passed, but that appears to have slipped by the wayside. There is nothing significant here, and almost nothing one might call "architecture". It appears to be pure engineering.

Of course, in that respect it would follow on the history of ballparks in Washington. Griffith Stadium looked like it was put together from a box of spare ballpark parts. (We should also acknowledge that the facade our own beloved Metropolitan Stadium was essentially some sprinklings of colored brick barely concealing rusty iron). I did notice that there are two roof heights, something which may be a nod to old Griffith Stadium.

Part of my dislike is the low and very squat profile. There are no soaring light standards, and only muted vertical lines of any kind. Ballparks, seen from the side, are all essentially short and wide buildings, but adding vertical components (usually having to do with the circulation of people to the various levels) can really make a difference in the overall character of a stadium.

A memorable example of such a detail is the tower built into Wrigley Field in LA. That park also featured flags along to outside perimeter, something you may notice if you look closely at some of the Washington drawings. Unfortunately, those little flags get completely lost in the massive bulk of the Nationals new park, where they really added a touch of flair in California. I think the Washington park really cries out for some unique architectural element to make it distinctive.

So, while the park looks functional, and any new ballpark is an exciting place, there's nothing here which really makes me want to say, "Wow!"

Comments


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Good analysis. One other thing I noticed is that the stadium turns its back to the River. No one in that ballpark will know that they are long Christian Guzman flyout from the Anacosta. Opportunity lost (one of many).

Posted on March 14, 2007 at 9:59 PM by DEC Highlight this comment 1

they should have designed the ballpark to mimic the historical structures of our nation's capital. white exterior texture, archs, pillars, fountains.

Posted on March 15, 2007 at 11:08 AM by steve Highlight this comment 2

At least with this venue's field facing
the north, some fans can see the Capitol
Dome (and maybe the Washington Monument).

Posted on March 17, 2007 at 5:09 PM by Chris Highlight this comment 3

Actually, a little bit of research with Google Earth reveals that only a few fans in the upper deck near the right field foul pole will be able to see the Washington Monument.

Likewise, only upper deck fans along the first base line might be able to catch a glimpse of the capitol.

They would have had to align the playing field northwest in order for the majority of fans to be able to see both.

Posted on March 17, 2007 at 5:50 PM by Rick 4

I for one kind've enjoy the squat short feel. the view from the outside would be better if it had some tall elements, but inside the park, its better to have a wide feel. Anyone who's been inside Brewers Ballpark knows what I'm talking about.

Posted on March 22, 2007 at 1:00 PM by Mike Highlight this comment 5


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Harmon Killebrew



Target HQ main entrance. Ballpark resemblance? (Inset.)












Someone please get those poor people a drink of water. (Gate 34, after the game had started)






They can put a camera just about anywhere. (Photo by Jeff Ewer)



Preparations underway (Field View)






Not much facade left to be finished at this point.



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Just some of the lumiaries who turned out for the unveiling (Terry is clearly thinking about Sidney Ponson).






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Party deck down the right field line









Stepping inside the circulation building



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The dish!



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Instrument of evil.



The New as viewed from The Old.



Banners on the parking ramp are a great touch. They help manage scale and turn a lemon into lemonade. On my way there today I passed the WCCO building and remembered how the Twins schedule used to be painted in giant form on the side of that building (which is no longer visible). Wouldn't that be a great thing to resurrect on the side of that ramp? A giant Twins schedule. I always thought that was cool.



The proposed wooden screen covering the circulation ramp on Fifth Street (at left is the equivalent screen on Seventh Street).



Hit gap, win suit!









A very early vision for TF's main concourse



Puckett atrium menu part 1



The right field overhang as seen from Seventh Street (with dude)



The Pohlads were loose. A-Rod looked, um, you decide.



Fan number 3,030,673 came through this gate a few moments after I took this picture.



The season was perfectly bookended by Mick Sterling on the plaza


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